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TV’s Dr. Oz has cancer scare

They want to stick that WHERE?!

You’ve probably seen him on Oprah, and you may watch his show, The Dr. Oz Show. Famous TV doc Dr. Mehmet Oz, well-known for his outspoken opinions on healthy lifestyles, had his own “Do I know cancer?” moment recently following a routine colonoscopy. His doctor found what is called a adenomatous polyp, otherwise known as a precancerous growth, on Dr. Oz’s intestine.

If unnoticed, the polyp would have most likely developed into colon cancer.

“I have done everything right,” Dr. Oz told PEOPLE magazine. “This was a shakeup for me…I don’t have any family history, and yet I’m high risk now.”

Dr. Oz had the precancerous growth removed, but will have to go back and be screened again in three months to ensure that no precancerous tissue remains, and if additional growths have developed. While scary, the doctor says that the discovery has changed his life, and reassured him that regular cancer screenings can truly save lives.

“I checked myself out for the show,” he says. “I would have put this off, like a lot of people. But I bet this saved my life.”

Why do so many people put off important, lifesaving cancer screenings such as colonoscopies and mammograms? Many people say it’s because they don’t like going to the doctor, it’s too expensive, they’re afraid of potential pain and discomfort, or that they just don’t have the time. We wanted to try and alleviate some of the worries people may have prior to a cancer screening, so below you’ll find a brief description of what you can expect at your first colonoscopy and mammogram.

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is an outpatient procedure. A doctor will insert a colonoscope (a long, thin tube-like instrument that’s flexible and has a camera on the end) into the rectum and will maneuver it through the colon. This allows the doctor to view any potential precancerous growths similar to the one found inside Dr. Oz’s intestine, and if necessary, the doc can take a small biopsy of any abnormal tissues that may be discovered during the exam. It takes just under one hour, and patients are mildly sedated so that they do not experience severe discomfort or pain. It’s recommended that someone accompany you to your colonoscopy so that you can be driven home safely, and the most common side effect is bloating, which diminishes quickly. You can eat and drink normally following the exam. What most people worry about is the prep before the exam, which involves clearing the bowels of all stool. Your doctor will prescribe medicine to clear your colon. The latest medicine available is actually a tablet, not a yucky-tasting liquid, which clears you out safely and more easily than previous methods! See? Not so bad!

Those 50 years of age and older should undergo this procedure every ten years, or as recommended by their physician. People with a family history of colon cancer may be directed to undergo a colonoscopy before they turn 50.

Mammogram

A mammogram screens for breast cancer, and involves taking an x-ray of the breast. Usually a technician takes two pictures of each breast. To some, the process can be daunting, as it involves exposing yourself to an unfamiliar x-ray tech, but most imaging centers do a good job of making patients feel comfortable, sometimes even warming up the machine ahead of time so it’s not so cold. If an irregularity is detected, sometimes a patient will be ordered to also undergo a sonogram (which is what doctors use to view unborn babies inside the womb). There is no prep involved for a mammogram.

Women aged 40 and older should have a mammogram every one or two years, and women who have a family history of breast cancer may undergo this screening before they turn 40.

Cancer screenings like the above could very well save your life, and for many, are covered under your health insurance. Dr. Oz’s experience is proof that biting the bullet and putting yourself through very temporary discomfort may be the best decision you ever make.

Source:

People Magazine

National Cancer Institute

5 Responses to “TV’s Dr. Oz has cancer scare”

  1. Tiffani Zauner says:

    Great post. Thanks!

  2. Linda says:

    Thank you Dr. Oz for posting this. I have to go soon for a colonoscopy. I have to get clearance from my Cardiologist. My primary care Dr. noticed thru my blood test that my white blood cells are high. Then she ordered a colonoscopy to make sure all is okay.

  3. NILKA TRUJILLO says:

    THIS IS 3RD BOUT WITH CANCER. I HAD BLADDER CANCER 19YRS. AGO, WAS OPERATED AND DID FINE, 6 YRS I HAD BREAST CANCER, HAD LUMP REMOVED,HAD RADATION, NOW ITS BACK STAGE 4, GOING THROUGH CHEMO AND ITS HORRIBLE. I’M 80 YRS. OLD, AND TODAY I CELEBRATE OUR 56TH ANNIVERSARY, WHY SHOULD I GO ON??? I CAN’T LIVE WITH THE PAIN, NAUSEA AND JUST BEING SICK ALL THE TIME. MY HEART GOES OUT TO ALL THAT ARE GONIG THROUGH ALL KINDS OF CANCER. THE CHEMO IS KILLING THE REST OF THE LIFE I HAVE. WHY SHOULD I GO ON???I KNOW THERE IS A CURE! GIVE IT TO THE CHILDREN…PLEASE.

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